Performance Improvements


#1

Hi,

I’ve been using Mockups 3.5.14 for a while now. It’s very easy to use so thank you for that.

I’m designing the screens for a large internal data maintenance system. I’ve currently got around 120 mockups in the same project. My project is now taking quite a while to close down after I’ve done a presentation and I’ve noticed that things are generally moving more slowly. I wondered if you had any tips for maintaining large projects with regard to optimising performance, If not I’ve got another 100 or so mockups to design so I’d like to know whether it would be better to split the project into smaller ones? This is possible but more inconvenient as obviously if there’s a change to common controls they have to be changed across multiple projects instead of just the one.

Another thing that would be really useful is if I could create a mockup hierarchy or logically group mockups together to mirror the different parts of the system. Is this possible?

Many thanks,

Andrew


#2

Hi Andrew and sorry for the hassle with this project.

First, I wanted to mention that there’s a more recent version (3.5.15) available here.

Your project seems pretty large indeed and we usually recommend to keep a project under 100 wireframes if possible, to help to keep optimal performances. The complexity of a project also depends on the data used. Large assets and complex controls (like Data Grids) can make a project slower too.

Splitting a project into smaller ones can be a nice way to help indeed and you can also organize them nicely using the hierarchy feature.

On a side note, we’ve recently launched our new web version, Balsamiq Cloud, that features our new native editor. We’re already working on our next major Desktop version and this should help to improve performances too.

Hope this helps! Let us know if you have any further question.

Best,


#3

Hi,

Many thanks for the prompt reply.

I’ll do as you suggest and download the latest version.

I’ll split the project and try out the hierarchy feature (which I didn’t realise was there).

Best regards,

Andrew